Here's some endangered species that you should get excited about seeing on safari in Namibia!

Sadly in Namibia alone there are approximately 145 species of animals and plants listed as Vulnerable, Endangered or Critically Endangered and even 1 species of marine life that has already gone extinct. While there are many factors affecting the many species that need our help, by far one of the biggest factors in Africa is loss of habitat and habitat fragmentation as human populations spread, taking wild spaces and converting them into agricultural lands.

Here are just a few of Namibia’s wildlife species that are in trouble, and that any sighting of these animals on a safari in Namibia is certainly a special experience.

Black Rhino
Status: Critically Endangered
It’s no secret that there is a crisis when it comes to the world’s rhino populations and the black rhino is no exception. In Namibia we are fortunate to have one of Africa’s healthiest black rhino populations, thanks to efforts by both the Namibian government and non-government organisations that work tirelessly to protect them. Namibia’s Save The Rhino Trust works tirelessly to not only protect these prehistoric animals, but also to continue to learn more about how they survive in some of Africa’s toughest terrains.
Threats:
Poaching for their horn
Where to spot:
Game drives in Etosha National Park
Rhino tracking (on foot) in Damaraland

hidden rhino, crouching safari in Namibia

Lappet Faced Vulture
Status: Endangered
While they may not be the cutest of creatures, vultures play a critical role in the eco-systems they live and the Lappet-faced vulture is no exception. These curious looking birds act as the garbage disposals of wild spaces, ensuring that there is nothing left behind from the kills of predators. While there is not one specific Namibian organisation protecting all Lappet Faced Vulture populations, there are a number of small projects that support vulture rehabilitation around the country.
Threats:
Poisoning of pests by farmers which leads subsequently leads to vultures consuming the poisoned carcasses of their prey.
Where to spot:
Game drives in Etosha National Park

Secretary Bird
Status: Endangered
These are certainly one of the more recognisable birds for novice safari goers. So called due to the quill like crest of feathers that give the appearance of a secretary with quill pens tucked behind his/her ears. One of only 2 birds of prey that hunt on the ground (the other the caracas from South America), these quirky birds prey on small rodents, amphibians, and reptiles.
Threats:
Habitat loss
Where to spot:
Game drives in Etosha National Park

Secretary Bird

African Elephant
Status: Endangered
Easily one of Africa’s most iconic creatures. In Namibia we are incredibly lucky to have healthy elephant populations, and even more so that some of these elephants live outside of formally protected areas like national parks such as in community conservancies in Damaraland, the Kunene, Bushmanland and the Zambezi and Kavango regions. While there is not one specific Namibian organisation protecting all elephant populations, there are a number of small project that support local elephant populations and aid communities to reduce human and wildlife conflict.
Threats:
Habitat loss
Human and wildlife conflict where elephants and human communities share living space
Where to spot:
Game drives in Etosha National Park
Elephant tracking in Damaraland
Free roaming through the Kunene & Zambezi Regions

Namibian Elephant

African Wild Dog
Status: Endangered
Easily one of Africa’s most charismatic predators, the African wild dogs ooze personality. They are highly social animals that live in packs of up to 40 and are one of the most successful hunters in the wild due to their incredible teamwork when hunting and endurance to tire out their prey. However, this also means they move quickly, so sightings are often fleeting. While there is not one specific Namibian organisation protecting all Wild Dog populations, there are a number of small projects that support local wild dog populations.
Threats:
Habitat loss and habitat fragmentation
Where to spot:
Game drives in the Zambezi region
Carnivore feeding tour at N/a’ankuse Wildlife Sanctuary

Wild Dog

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